Yes, LGBTQ youth need access to quality sexual health information!

Yes, LGBTQ youth need access to quality sexual health information!

Check out this uplifting video on sports and LGBTQ folks.

Happy Friday!

It’s that time of the year again!! 

Time to get out, have some fun, and, most importantly, show your pride for the LGBTQ community! Check out our new video portraying Chicago’s 2014 pride.

This year we asked folks how they make an IMPACT on the community (who doesn’t love a little word play?).  People feel and express pride in different ways, and this question helped illustrate that.

Folks were joyous and offered some great responses – I make an IMPACT by:

“Spreading kindness”
“Being out and PROUD!!”
“Loving our friends, no matter what.”
“Making sure there is a Gay Straight Alliance in every Illinois school”

It was amazing to see everyone being proud and letting us know how they make an impact on the community!!

Until next year, stay awesome and proud.

"If we want to end internalized homophobia, we need to first end homophobia," she says. "It’s as simple as that."

~ Dr. Birkett

(Source: pozmagazine)

"For what it’s worth: it’s never too late to be whoever you want to be. I hope you live a life you’re proud of, and if you find you’re not, I hope you have the strength to start over again."

— F. Scott Fitzgerald (via un-exotic)

(Source: nuclearharvest, via thegayya)

Here is a snippet of what is going on at the 20th International AIDS conference in Melbourne, Australia via Twitter.

pozmagazine:

Check Out POZ Mag’s Continuing Coverage of #AIDS2014
We’re working hard in both Melbourne and NYC to help bring you all the latest research, advocacy, policy and news from the 20th International AIDS Conference.

pozmagazine:

Check Out POZ Mag’s Continuing Coverage of #AIDS2014

We’re working hard in both Melbourne and NYC to help bring you all the latest research, advocacy, policy and news from the 20th International AIDS Conference.

glsen:

gaywrites:

It’s official! President Obama has signed an executive order granting workplace equality to LGBT federal workers. This is a historic day — but we’re not done yet. Next up, let’s enact workplace protections for every LGBT employee, everywhere in the country. 

Check out GLSEN’s statement on this important event here

Anonymous said: Towards the whole "pronouns hurt people's feelings" topic. Am I REALLY the only person on the planet that thinks people are becoming far to sensative? Nearly to the point that they shouldn't leave their little home bubbles in the case that a bird chirps next to them in a way that sounds like a mean word. Maybe, JUST MAYBE, we're becoming a little TOO coddling and people need to learn to deal with simplistic shit like words. And yes, I've been insulted and made fun of. I got over it. So can you.

thefrogman:

Supposedly invented by the Chinese, there is an ancient form of torture that is nothing more than cold, tiny drops falling upon a person’s forehead. 

On its own, a single drop is nothing. It falls upon the brow making a tiny splash. It doesn’t hurt. No real harm comes from it. 

In multitudes, the drops are still fairly harmless. Other than a damp forehead, there really is no cause for concern. 

The key to the torture is being restrained. You cannot move. You must feel each drop. You have lost all control over stopping these drops of water from splashing on your forehead. 

It still doesn’t seem like that big of a deal. But person after person, time and time again—would completely unravel psychologically. They all had a breaking point where each drop turned into a horror. Building and building until all sense of sanity was completely lost. 

"It was just a joke, quite being so sensitive."

"They used the wrong pronoun, big deal."

"So your parents don’t understand, it could be worse."

Day after day. Drop after drop. It builds up. A single instance on its own is no big deal. A few drops, not a problem. But when you are restrained, when you cannot escape the drops, when it is unending—these drops can be agony. 

People aren’t sensitive because they can’t take a joke. Because they can’t take being misgendered one time. Because they lack a thick skin. 

People are sensitive because the drops are unending and they have no escape from them. 

You are only seeing the tiny, harmless, single drop hitting these so-called “sensitive” people. You are failing to see the thousands of drops endured before that. You are failing to see the restraints that make them inescapable.

Well said!