Be in the know regarding sexual health - including what you can do after engaging in risky sex.
What is PEP?
PEP stands for Post-Exposure Prophylaxis. PEP is a medicine taken by people who may have been exposed to HIV during a single event (like unprotected sex or needle-sharing) to reduce the chances of becoming HIV positive. PEP consists of 2-3 antiretroviral medications that can help stop HIV from spreading in your body. To be effective, PEP must be taken as soon as possible, but no more than 72 hours (3 days) after being exposed to HIV. In addition, the pills must be taken daily for 28 days.
It is important to know that PEP is not 100% effective – it does not guarantee that someone exposed to HIV will not become infected with the disease. PEP is different than PrEP. If you are continually exposed to HIV (by engaging in risky sex behaviors or injection drug use), then you should talk to your doctor about takingPrEP.
Credit: AIDS.gov

Is PEP right for me?
PEP can be taken by anyone who may have been exposed to HIV during a single event. Sometimes healthcare workers take PEP after being exposed to blood or body fluids that may contain HIV. It can also be taken by individuals after having unprotected sex, sharing a needle for injection drug use, or following a sexual assault.
If you think you have been exposed to HIV, visit your health care provider immediately to determine if PEP is right for you.
Keep in mind that PEP is not a substitute for regular, proven HIV prevention methods such as using PrEP (an HIV prevention pill), condoms, or sterile injection needles.
When should I take PEP?
You should start taking PEP as soon as possible after the HIV exposure event. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), research shows that PEP has little to no effect in preventing HIV if it is taken more than 72 hours (3 days) after exposure [1].
People who take PEP must commit to taking the pills (usually 2-3) every day for 28 days. Once you finish the treatment, your doctor will ask you to take several HIV tests (typically at 4-6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months) to confirm your status. Because PEP is not 100% effective, you should keep using condoms with sex partners and avoid sharing needles with others.
Where can I get PEP?
If you think you were exposed to HIV, talk to your health care provider right away. You can also get PEP at emergency rooms, urgent care clinics, or your local HIV clinic.
Is there help to pay for PEP?
There are different options to help pay for PEP based on the HIV exposure event. If you are a healthcare worker, your insurance should usually pay for PEP. If you were a victim of sexual assault, you may qualify for assistance through the Office for Victims of Crime (see the contact information for each state). If you do not have insurance, talk with your health care provider about applying for patient assistance programs.
Where can I get more information?
CDC PEP Basics
AIDS.gov PEP Info

Be in the know regarding sexual health - including what you can do after engaging in risky sex.

What is PEP?

PEP stands for Post-Exposure Prophylaxis. PEP is a medicine taken by people who may have been exposed to HIV during a single event (like unprotected sex or needle-sharing) to reduce the chances of becoming HIV positive. PEP consists of 2-3 antiretroviral medications that can help stop HIV from spreading in your body. To be effective, PEP must be taken as soon as possible, but no more than 72 hours (3 days) after being exposed to HIV. In addition, the pills must be taken daily for 28 days.

It is important to know that PEP is not 100% effective – it does not guarantee that someone exposed to HIV will not become infected with the disease. PEP is different than PrEP. If you are continually exposed to HIV (by engaging in risky sex behaviors or injection drug use), then you should talk to your doctor about takingPrEP.

Infographic describing PEP and how it is used

Credit: AIDS.gov

Is PEP right for me?

PEP can be taken by anyone who may have been exposed to HIV during a single event. Sometimes healthcare workers take PEP after being exposed to blood or body fluids that may contain HIV. It can also be taken by individuals after having unprotected sex, sharing a needle for injection drug use, or following a sexual assault.

If you think you have been exposed to HIV, visit your health care provider immediately to determine if PEP is right for you.

Keep in mind that PEP is not a substitute for regular, proven HIV prevention methods such as using PrEP (an HIV prevention pill), condoms, or sterile injection needles.

When should I take PEP?

You should start taking PEP as soon as possible after the HIV exposure event. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), research shows that PEP has little to no effect in preventing HIV if it is taken more than 72 hours (3 days) after exposure [1].

People who take PEP must commit to taking the pills (usually 2-3) every day for 28 days. Once you finish the treatment, your doctor will ask you to take several HIV tests (typically at 4-6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months) to confirm your status. Because PEP is not 100% effective, you should keep using condoms with sex partners and avoid sharing needles with others.

Where can I get PEP?

If you think you were exposed to HIV, talk to your health care provider right away. You can also get PEP at emergency rooms, urgent care clinics, or your local HIV clinic.

Is there help to pay for PEP?

There are different options to help pay for PEP based on the HIV exposure event. If you are a healthcare worker, your insurance should usually pay for PEP. If you were a victim of sexual assault, you may qualify for assistance through the Office for Victims of Crime (see the contact information for each state). If you do not have insurance, talk with your health care provider about applying for patient assistance programs.

Where can I get more information?

CDC PEP Basics

AIDS.gov PEP Info

Here is a snippet of what is going on at the 20th International AIDS conference in Melbourne, Australia via Twitter.

matthulksmash:

As if the events surrounding this weren’t tragic enough…

This is truly devastating news. It makes me sick just thinking about it.

pozmagazine:

Media Bungles Another HIV Story
In a rash of inaccurate and hyperbolic reporting, numerous press outlets (from the Atlantic to Joe. My. God.’s blog) misreported over the weekend that WHO wants all gay men to take PrEP.
It’s really just a recommendation. Here are the facts on the announcement.

Thanks for clarifying!

pozmagazine:

Media Bungles Another HIV Story

In a rash of inaccurate and hyperbolic reporting, numerous press outlets (from the Atlantic to Joe. My. God.’s blog) misreported over the weekend that WHO wants all gay men to take PrEP.

It’s really just a recommendation. Here are the facts on the announcement.

Thanks for clarifying!

What’s it like to get an HIV test??

Regular HIV testing is an important way to protect your health and the health of your sexual partners.  But how do you get an HIV test and what’s it like?  This video shows how to get an HIV test at Center on Halsted in Chicago.  The testing experience is similar in clinics across the country.  To find out more about testing atCenter on Halsted call 773-661-0910 or visit centeronhalsted.org/HIV.html.  If you call the State of Illinois AIDS/HIV & STD Hotline at 1-800-AID-AIDS (1-800-243-2437), staff can also help you find other HIV testing and STD testing and treatment locations in Illinois that are near you. If you are outside of Illinois you can usean app to find a testing location near you.

This video was created by the IMPACT LGBT Health and Development Program at Northwestern University in partnership with Center on Halsted.

(Source: vimeo.com)

Be in the Know about PrEP!
"PrEP is an innovative HIV prevention strategy that could change the way we fight the AIDS epidemic.
What is PrEP?
PrEP stands for Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis. The word prophylaxis means to prevent the spread of infection or disease. PrEP is a way for people who are HIV negative to prevent future HIV infections by taking one pill every day. The pill contains two medications that can help stop HIV from spreading in your body. If you are exposed to HIV through sex or injection drug use, the medicines lower the chance that you will become infected with HIV. To be effective, PrEP must be taken every day and used along with other prevention methods like condoms. The pill currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration is called Truvada”
Come read more about PrEP including effectiveness and where you can get it on our youth blog!
http://www.impactprogram.org/youth-blog/youth-blog-know-prep/

Be in the Know about PrEP!

"PrEP is an innovative HIV prevention strategy that could change the way we fight the AIDS epidemic.

What is PrEP?

PrEP stands for Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis. The word prophylaxis means to prevent the spread of infection or disease. PrEP is a way for people who are HIV negative to prevent future HIV infections by taking one pill every day. The pill contains two medications that can help stop HIV from spreading in your body. If you are exposed to HIV through sex or injection drug use, the medicines lower the chance that you will become infected with HIV. To be effective, PrEP must be taken every day and used along with other prevention methods like condoms. The pill currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration is called Truvada”

Come read more about PrEP including effectiveness and where you can get it on our youth blog!

http://www.impactprogram.org/youth-blog/youth-blog-know-prep/

pozmagazine:

New CDC Study: Bisexual Men Have Higher STI Rates Than GaysMSMW are also less likely to use condoms or get tested. Experts say the social stigma toward bisexuals often contribute to the groups’ higher HIV and STI rates.  In the U.S., bisexuals make up an estimated 2 percent of the sexually active males in the United States.

pozmagazine:

New CDC Study: Bisexual Men Have Higher STI Rates Than Gays

MSMW are also less likely to use condoms or get tested. Experts say the social stigma toward bisexuals often contribute to the groups’ higher HIV and STI rates.  In the U.S., bisexuals make up an estimated 2 percent of the sexually active males in the United States.

(via safecampaign)

sqs-tec:

Hi everyone,

I wanted to share a little bit of information about a study I’m working on—it’s called LifeSkills, and it’s an HIV prevention intervention that is currently being tested here at Lurie Children’s Hospital. Can you share this information with your networks? I’d…

Mondo Guerra in Chicago! IMPACT video from his talk at Center on Halsted: